Tag Archives: Vitamin

What is Resveratrol?

Posted on 01. Dec, 2010 by .

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Resveratrol (trans-Resveratrol) is a phytoalexin  (an antibiotic enzyme) produced by plants under stress as when attacked by fungi, disease-causing pathogens, adverse weather, insects or animals. It is a polyphenol with antioxidant properties as well; and thus protects the plants from UV radiation and other free radical damage.

resveratrolselect

Resveratrol can also be chemically synthesized.

Seventy-two plant species are known to produce Resveratrol.

Some examples of plants or plant-based products and their Resveratrol average production capacity are:

  • Red wine – about 160 micrograms per ounce;
  • Boiled peanuts and red grapes – 75 micrograms per ounce;
  • Blueberries – 8 micrograms per ounce;
  • Japanese knotweed (Polygonum cuspidatum) – 6 micrograms per ounce; and
  • Bilberries – 3 micrograms per ounce.

Grapes, the most abundant natural source known, contain Resveratrol primarily in the skins, but also in the roots, seeds and vines depending on the cultivar (cultivated variety).

It is interesting to note that grape juice contains just half the amount of Resveratrol as red wine. Some speculate that the stress of the fermentation process and concurrent injuries to the skin induce increased production of the anti-stress enzyme.

When Resveratrol burst onto the anti-aging scene a few years ago, it was thought to be the key to the French Paradox.

Despite the fact that French men consume wine daily along with their high-fat diet, they have one-third the risk of heart attack of American men. However it is now believed that Resveratrol is only part of the answer.

It should be noted that Resveratrol is also a phytoestrogen (plant estrogen). The estrogenic properties of this chemical may play a role in the beneficial cardiovascular benefits of red wine by increasing blood levels of HDL, the healthy form of cholesterol.

On the other hand, pregnant or nursing women, women on hormone replacement therapy or those who have had estrogen-dependent cancer are advised to ask their health care professional before using resevratrol supplementation.

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Vitamin C and cancer

Posted on 12. Nov, 2010 by .

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Vitamin C and cancer. For cancer resources, information about cancer treatment options and cancer patient support.. Cancer patients seeking links to cancer resources, information and support will find this site provides a general orientation designed to help you make your own choices and decisions concerning alternative cancer treatments or orthodox cancer treatments.

For decades the `dialogue’ – to use a polite word – between those advocating vitamin supplements and those attacking the taking of supplements seems as if it is finally coming to a conclusion. The pro-supplement side has won – perhaps not yet decisively (on a points count rather than a knockout). The US National Academy of Sciences believes that large sections of the community – especially the elderly – need to increase their B-12 (advice varies from 24-400 micrograms per day). Vitamin D deficiency is also widespread. A supplement of 800 iu of vitamin D has been linked conclusively to fewer fractures and to devreased incidence of breast cancer. Too much sun-avoidance is a bad thing (the body makes vitamin D from exposure to sunlight).

The US National Council for Responsible Nutrition has also weighed in with advice to take vitamin E (400-800 iu per day) and vitamin C (they suggest 500 mg per day).

On the vitamin C question, I go along with Linus Pauling and say that 6-18 grams a day is what we should be taking. The argument is simple: almost all mammals produce their own vitamin C. They produce large quantities of it. For example, a 70 kilo goat produces 13 grams a day on a good day. On a bad day when it is severely stressed, it will produce up to 100 grams a day. If other animals need so much, how is it that doctors are insisting we only need 500 mgs. It doesn’t make sense to me.

Vitamin C is important for cancer patients.

The reasons Ewan Cameron and Linus Pauling looked at vitamin C as a possible anti-cancer agent were two-fold.

A tumour progresses by invading cells. In order to invade cells it must break through the cell walls. The cell walls are strengthened if the `intercellular cement’ (Pauling’s term) was strengthened. This intercellular cement consists of long molecular chains themselves strengthened by fibrils of collagen. Cancer cells release an enzyme – hyaluronidase – that can break down the long molecular chains and another enzyme – collagenase – that can dissolve the collagen. This makes invasion easy as the cell wall essentially collapses.

It was then discovered that vitamin C helped cells to produce a substance that inhibits hyaluronidase. The more vitamin C in the system the more the inhibitor was released. Also vitamin C is neccessary for collagen production. So, for these two reasons, it was assumed that vitamin C would help protect cells against invading malignancies.

Anyone – not predisposed to rejecting the conclusions – reading the evidence in their book, Cancer & Vitamin C, will surely come away feeling they have proved their case.

In fact further studies suggested that patients did best when they took:

* Vitamin C: 10-25 grams a day
* Vitamin E: 400-1600 iu a day
* Vitamin B: several high dose (ie B-50) pills a day
* Vitamin A: a couple of glasses of fresh carrot juice a day
* Multi-mineral: several high dose pills a day

Pauling & Cameron gave their patients 10 grams a day – though some patients required more. Pauling himself recommends supplementation at 6-18 grams a day. Since vitamin C tends to leach minerals from the system it is important to add a multi-mineral supplement.

In addition, Vitamin C is of value for the following diseases and conditions:

* Asthma and other allergies
* Depression
* Diabetes
* Healing
* Heart Disease
* Strokes
* Thrombosis
* Liver disease
* Viral infections
* Problems of fertility and pregnancy

In fact, vitamin C is used in so many bio-chemical processes in the body that it is probably worth upping your intake no matter what the problem. You can’t overdose on vitamin C and it is not at all toxic.

Vitamin C comes in various forms. Pure ascorbic acid is not recommended, certainly not on an empty stomach – it is acidic! The salts of ascorbic acid are called ascorbates. These will not cause any unpleasantness. The usual mixes are sodium ascorbate (recommended by Linus Pauling and others), calcium ascorbate (which some say is useless for cancer patients – see discussion on calcium in New Facts page) and the combination that I prefer which is a combination of magnesium and potassium ascorbate.

Ascorbate induces autophagy in pancreatic cancer.

Ascorbate (ascorbic acid, vitamin C) is one of the early, unorthodox treatments for cancer. The evidence upon which people base the use of ascorbate in cancer treatment falls into two categories: clinical data on dose concentration relationships, and laboratory data describing potential cell toxicity with high concentrations of ascorbate in vitro. Clinical data show that when ascorbate is given orally, fasting plasma concentrations are tightly controlled by decreased absorption, increased urine excretion, and reduced ascorbate bioavailability. In contrast, when ascorbate is administered intravenously, concentrations in the millimolar level are achieved. Thus, it is clear that intravenous administration of ascorbate can yield very high plasma levels, while oral treatment does not.

references and thank you
http://www.fightingcancer.com/vitaminc.htm
www.vitamincfoundation.org
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20400857

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Vitamin That Your Body Needs

Posted on 02. Nov, 2010 by .

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Vitamins are organic compounds which are needed in small quantities to sustain life. We get vitamins from food, because the human body either does not produce enough of them, or none at all.

An organic compound contains carbon. When an organism (living thing) cannot produce enough of an organic chemical compound that it needs in tiny amounts, and has to get it from food, it is called a vitamin.

Sometimes the compound is a vitamin for a human but not for some other animals. For example, vitamin C (ascorbic acid) is a vitamin for humans but not for dogs, because dogs can produce (synthesize) enough for their own needs, while humans cannot.

Vitamins are substances that your body needs to grow and develop normally. There are 13 vitamins your body needs. They are vitamins A, C, D, E, K and the B vitamins (thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, biotin, vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12 and folate). You can usually get all your vitamins from the foods you eat. Your body can also make vitamins D and K. People who eat a vegetarian diet may need to take a vitamin B12 supplement.
Each vitamin has specific jobs. If you have low levels of certain vitamins, you may develop a deficiency disease. For example, if you don’t get enough vitamin D, you could develop rickets. Some vitamins may help prevent medical problems. Vitamin A prevents night blindness.
The best way to get enough vitamins is to eat a balanced diet with a variety of foods. In some cases, you may need to take a daily multivitamin for optimal health. However, high doses of some vitamins can make you sick.

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