Archive for 'vitamin C'

vitamin C

Posted on 12. Nov, 2010 by .

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Vitamin C is an antioxidant. Antioxidants are substances that may protect your cells against the effects of free radicals. Free radicals are molecules produced when your body breaks down food, or by environmental exposures like tobacco smoke and radiation. Vitamin C is important for your skin, bones, and connective tissue. It promotes healing and helps the body absorb iron.

Vitamin C comes from fruits and vegetables. Good sources include citrus, red and green peppers, tomatoes, broccoli, and greens. Some juices and cereals have added vitamin C.

Some people may need extra vitamin C:

* Pregnant/breastfeeding women
* Smokers
* People recovering from surgery
* Burn victims

Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) is a water-soluble vitamin, which is necessary in the body to form collagen in bones, cartilage, muscle, and blood vessels and aids in the absorption of iron. Dietary sources of vitamin C include fruits and vegetables, particularly citrus fruits such as oranges.

Severe deficiency of vitamin C causes scurvy. Although rare, scurvy includes potentially severe consequences, and can cause sudden death. Patients with scurvy are treated with vitamin C and should be under medical supervision.

Many uses for vitamin C have been proposed, but few have been found to be beneficial in scientific studies. In particular, research in asthma, cancer, and diabetes remains inconclusive, and no benefits have been found in the prevention of cataracts or heart disease.

The use of vitamin C in the prevention/treatment of the common cold and respiratory infections remains controversial, with ongoing research. For cold prevention , more than 30 clinical trials including over 10,000 participants have examined the effects of taking daily vitamin C. Overall, no significant reduction in the risk of developing colds has been observed. In people who developed colds while taking vitamin C, no difference in severity of symptoms has been seen overall, although a very small significant reduction in the duration of colds has been reported (approximately 10% in adults and 15% in children). Notably, a subset of studies in people living in extreme circumstances, including soldiers in sub-arctic exercises, skiers, and marathon runners, have found a significant reduction in the risk of developing a cold by approximately 50%. This area merits additional study and may be of particular interest to elite athletes or military personnel.

For cold treatment , numerous studies have examined the effects of starting vitamin C after the onset of cold symptoms. So far, no significant benefits have been observed.

references and thank you

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/vitamin-c/NS_patient-vitaminc
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/vitaminc.html

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Vitamin C and cancer

Posted on 12. Nov, 2010 by .

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Vitamin C and cancer. For cancer resources, information about cancer treatment options and cancer patient support.. Cancer patients seeking links to cancer resources, information and support will find this site provides a general orientation designed to help you make your own choices and decisions concerning alternative cancer treatments or orthodox cancer treatments.

For decades the `dialogue’ – to use a polite word – between those advocating vitamin supplements and those attacking the taking of supplements seems as if it is finally coming to a conclusion. The pro-supplement side has won – perhaps not yet decisively (on a points count rather than a knockout). The US National Academy of Sciences believes that large sections of the community – especially the elderly – need to increase their B-12 (advice varies from 24-400 micrograms per day). Vitamin D deficiency is also widespread. A supplement of 800 iu of vitamin D has been linked conclusively to fewer fractures and to devreased incidence of breast cancer. Too much sun-avoidance is a bad thing (the body makes vitamin D from exposure to sunlight).

The US National Council for Responsible Nutrition has also weighed in with advice to take vitamin E (400-800 iu per day) and vitamin C (they suggest 500 mg per day).

On the vitamin C question, I go along with Linus Pauling and say that 6-18 grams a day is what we should be taking. The argument is simple: almost all mammals produce their own vitamin C. They produce large quantities of it. For example, a 70 kilo goat produces 13 grams a day on a good day. On a bad day when it is severely stressed, it will produce up to 100 grams a day. If other animals need so much, how is it that doctors are insisting we only need 500 mgs. It doesn’t make sense to me.

Vitamin C is important for cancer patients.

The reasons Ewan Cameron and Linus Pauling looked at vitamin C as a possible anti-cancer agent were two-fold.

A tumour progresses by invading cells. In order to invade cells it must break through the cell walls. The cell walls are strengthened if the `intercellular cement’ (Pauling’s term) was strengthened. This intercellular cement consists of long molecular chains themselves strengthened by fibrils of collagen. Cancer cells release an enzyme – hyaluronidase – that can break down the long molecular chains and another enzyme – collagenase – that can dissolve the collagen. This makes invasion easy as the cell wall essentially collapses.

It was then discovered that vitamin C helped cells to produce a substance that inhibits hyaluronidase. The more vitamin C in the system the more the inhibitor was released. Also vitamin C is neccessary for collagen production. So, for these two reasons, it was assumed that vitamin C would help protect cells against invading malignancies.

Anyone – not predisposed to rejecting the conclusions – reading the evidence in their book, Cancer & Vitamin C, will surely come away feeling they have proved their case.

In fact further studies suggested that patients did best when they took:

* Vitamin C: 10-25 grams a day
* Vitamin E: 400-1600 iu a day
* Vitamin B: several high dose (ie B-50) pills a day
* Vitamin A: a couple of glasses of fresh carrot juice a day
* Multi-mineral: several high dose pills a day

Pauling & Cameron gave their patients 10 grams a day – though some patients required more. Pauling himself recommends supplementation at 6-18 grams a day. Since vitamin C tends to leach minerals from the system it is important to add a multi-mineral supplement.

In addition, Vitamin C is of value for the following diseases and conditions:

* Asthma and other allergies
* Depression
* Diabetes
* Healing
* Heart Disease
* Strokes
* Thrombosis
* Liver disease
* Viral infections
* Problems of fertility and pregnancy

In fact, vitamin C is used in so many bio-chemical processes in the body that it is probably worth upping your intake no matter what the problem. You can’t overdose on vitamin C and it is not at all toxic.

Vitamin C comes in various forms. Pure ascorbic acid is not recommended, certainly not on an empty stomach – it is acidic! The salts of ascorbic acid are called ascorbates. These will not cause any unpleasantness. The usual mixes are sodium ascorbate (recommended by Linus Pauling and others), calcium ascorbate (which some say is useless for cancer patients – see discussion on calcium in New Facts page) and the combination that I prefer which is a combination of magnesium and potassium ascorbate.

Ascorbate induces autophagy in pancreatic cancer.

Ascorbate (ascorbic acid, vitamin C) is one of the early, unorthodox treatments for cancer. The evidence upon which people base the use of ascorbate in cancer treatment falls into two categories: clinical data on dose concentration relationships, and laboratory data describing potential cell toxicity with high concentrations of ascorbate in vitro. Clinical data show that when ascorbate is given orally, fasting plasma concentrations are tightly controlled by decreased absorption, increased urine excretion, and reduced ascorbate bioavailability. In contrast, when ascorbate is administered intravenously, concentrations in the millimolar level are achieved. Thus, it is clear that intravenous administration of ascorbate can yield very high plasma levels, while oral treatment does not.

references and thank you
http://www.fightingcancer.com/vitaminc.htm
www.vitamincfoundation.org
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20400857

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Vitamin C Content for Selected Fruits and Vegetables

Posted on 12. Nov, 2010 by .

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The data in this table is taken from the USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, which was at Release 11 at the time of this writing.

The serving sizes given below are approximate values for obtaining roughly 10mg of vitamin C. Note that not all fruits and vegetables are created equal, so your actual mileage may vary. Protein, calcium and phosphorus totals are also approximate values for the given serving sizes.

Food Approximate serving size for 10mg Vitamin C Protein (mg) Calcium (mg) Phosphorus (mg)
Apples (w/skin) 1-1/4 apples (3 per lb) 0.356 12.274 12.274
Baby Carrots 12 carrots 0.952 27.381 45.238
Bananas 1 banana 1.099 6.596 21.986
Broccoli Flower Clusters 1/8 cup 0.322 5.150 7.081
Carrots 1 cup 1.075 29.032 47.312
Celery 3-1/2 stalks 1.143 57.143 35.714
Cucumbers 2 cups 1.325 26.425 37.750
Dandelion Greens 1/2 cup 0.770 53.429 18.857
Green Bell Peppers 1/7 pepper 0.101 1.008 2.128
Kale 1/8 cup 0.275 11.250 4.667
Kiwis 1/8 cup 0.102 2.653 4.082
Looseleaf Lettuce 5-1/2 leaves 0.722 37.778 13.889
Mustard Greens 1/4 cup 0.385 14.714 6.143
Oranges (Florida) 1/7 fruit (2-5/8″ diameter fruit) 0.156 9.556 2.667
Parsley 1/8 cup 0.226 10.376 4.361
Raspberries 1/3 cup 0.361 8.800 4.800
Red Bell Peppers 1/14 pepper 0.048 0.474 1.000
Romain Lettuce 4 leaves 0.667 15.000 18.750
Spinach 2/3 cup 1.029 35.222 17.433
Tomatos (November through May, average) 1 fruit (2-3/5″ diameter) 0.902 5.0000 24.000
Tomatos (June through October, average) 1/3 fruit (2-3/5″ diameter) 1.409 1.9231 9.234

references and thank you
http://www.aracnet.com/~seagull/Guineas/VitaminC.html

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