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Vitamin B5 or Panththenic Acid

Posted on 09. Nov, 2010 by .

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Pantothenic acid, also known as vitamin B5, as well as the “anti-stress vitamin” is part of the B group vitamins and classified as a water-soluble vitamin. This nutrient can be manufactured in the body by the intestinal flora.

It is widely found in both plants and animals including meat, vegetables, cereal grains, legumes, eggs, and milk.

The body uses pantothenic acid, also known as vitamin B5, to break down carbohydrates, proteins and fats for energy.

Some claims have been made that pantothenic acid is effective for treatment of nerve damage, breathing problems, itching and other skin problems, but these claims have not been proven in clinical trials.

Vitamin B5 – pantothenic acid – is required for

Vitamin B5 plays an important role in the secretion of hormones, such as cortisone because of the role it plays in supporting the adrenal gland. These hormones assist the metabolism, help to fight allergies and are beneficial in the maintenance of healthy skin, muscles and nerves.

Pantothenic acid is also used in the release of energy as well as the metabolism of fat, protein and carbohydrates. It is used in the creation of lipids, neurotransmitters, steroid hormones and hemoglobin.

Some are of the opinion that pantothenic acid is also helpful to fight wrinkles as well as graying of the hair

Insufficient evidence to rate effectiveness for

  • Skin problems.
  • Alcoholism.
  • Allergies.
  • Hair loss.
  • Asthma.
  • Heart problems.
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome.
  • Lung disorders.
  • Colitis.
  • Eye infections (conjunctivitis).
  • Convulsions.
  • Kidney disorders.
  • Dandruff.
  • Depression.
  • Diabetic problems.
  • Enhancing immune function.
  • Headache.
  • Hyperactivity.
  • Low blood pressure.
  • Inability to sleep (insomnia).
  • Irritability.
  • Multiple sclerosis.
  • Muscular dystrophy.
  • Muscle cramps.
  • Other conditions.

Deficiency of vitamin B5

With Vitamin B5 in short supply symptoms like fatigue, headaches, nausea, tingling in the hands, depression, personality changes and cardiac instability have been reported.

Frequent infection, fatigue, abdominal pains, sleep disturbances and neurological disorders including numbness, paresthesia (abnormal sensation such as “burning feet” syndrome), muscle weakness and cramps are also possible indications that this nutrient is in short supply.

Biochemical changes include increased insulin sensitivity, lowered blood cholesterol, decreased serum potassium, and failure of adrenocorticotropin to induce eosinopenia.

How to Take It:

Recommended daily intakes of dietary vitamin B5 are listed below:

Pediatric

  • Infants birth – 6 months: 1.7 mg
  • Infants 6 months – 1 year: 1.8 mg
  • Children 1 – 3 years: 2 mg
  • Children 4 – 8 years: 3 mg
  • Children 9 – 13 years: 4 mg
  • Adolescents 14 – 18 years: 5 mg

Adult

  • 19 years and older: 5 mg
  • Pregnant females: 6 mg
  • Breastfeeding women: 7 mg

Higher doses may be recommended by a health care provider for the treatment of specific conditions.

  • Rheumatoid arthritis: 2,000 mg/day
  • High cholesterol/triglycerides: 300 mg pantethine, 3 times daily (900 mg/day)

references and thank you

http://www.lifeclinic.com/focus/nutrition/vitamin-b5.asp

http://www.anyvitamins.com/vitamin-b5-pantothenic-info.htm

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/853.html

http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/vitamin-b5-000336.htm

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